The School of Applied Psychology's Blog gather round our soap box - page 2

Food allergy and food intolerance – is the reported impact on our psychology real or exaggerated?

Food allergy and food intolerance – is the reported impact on our psychology real or exaggerated?

By Audrey DunnGalvin   Data on the European and global prevalence of food allergy and intolerances suggest that both reported and actual rates are increasing. Food allergy is becoming a major public health concern affecting up to 5% of adults and 8% of children, with…

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13th Annual Psychology, Health and Medicine Conference

13th Annual Psychology, Health and Medicine Conference

27th May University College Cork Dr Karen Matvienko-Sikar The superstitious among us may consider thirteen to be an unlucky number. That certainly won’t be the case for the 13th Annual Psychology, Health and Medicine Conference. This year the conference is being hosted in University College…

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Feeling our way

Feeling our way

Students from UCC’s Work and Organisational Psychology/Behaviour Masters. By. Dr. Carol Linehan I heard on the radio this morning that a survey in Irish workplaces identified the top ten phrases that irritate the hell out of people. These included “leave it with me”, “I’ll reach…

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What happens when Creativity becomes more important than Research?

What happens when Creativity becomes more important than Research?

From the Theory of Relativity to Apple’s 1,000 new jobs in Cork.   By Kasia Pyrz   It was one of those long evenings during which motivating a thirteen-year-old to memorise internal parts and workings of a volcano was proving to be a challenge. Being…

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…..I’ll sleep when I’m dead.

…..I’ll sleep when I’m dead.

by Samantha Dockray Depending on your age and/or musical preference I may have just given you an earworm from Bon Jovi, the Cure or Warren Zevon. Giving away my age – if not musical preference – the lyrics most familiar to me are by Bon…

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Reflections on resilience from the Dublin Lockout (1913) to the rise of ISIS (2015)

Reflections on resilience from the Dublin Lockout (1913) to the rise of ISIS (2015)

by Dr. Angela Veale It was a moment of personal revelation. I checked the 1901 and 1911 Irish census data at census@nationalarchives. There, in the handwriting of my ancestor, Thomas Veale, was a digitalised record of lives once lived. In 1901, Thomas, aged 46 years…

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Rising tides and leaky boats – quite an old phenomenon

Rising tides and leaky boats – quite an old phenomenon

by Dr. Raegan Murphy Increasing intelligence? When investigating intelligence test score data (commonly referred to as IQ scores) since the 1900s we see that these scores have increased over time. This temporal secular upward trend has been greeted with some amount of positive enthusiasm. The…

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