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Applied Psychology in a Community Context

Applied Psychology in a Community Context

By Mary Tobin     In the swampy lowland, messy, confusing problems defy technical solution.  The irony of this situation is that the problems of the high ground tend to be relatively unimportant to individuals or society at large, however great their technical interest may…

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I’m Still Here

I’m Still Here

by Aoife O’Leary   The ability of people with dementia to recall familiar melodies and song lyrics is uniquely paradoxical, as dementia is most notably typified by a progressive decline in the cognitive faculty of memory, while research has shown that memory for music is…

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Can being too good be bad?

Can being too good be bad?

By Niamh  Ni Shuilleabhain   ‘‘Oh my arms aren’t as big, as his, he’s gone ten abs, I didn’t know you could have ten.” –Palmer (2016) It would appear that obsession with diet, fitness and body image is no longer a predominantly female issue. This…

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War of Attrition: A Lab story

War of Attrition: A Lab story

By Shane Galvin In psychology aggression is defined as the willingness to cause harm to another. This harm view is a highly contested definition of aggression and academics don’t seem to be able to really agree on what aggression is (for example, see back and…

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Learning about ourselves

Learning about ourselves

By James Cully There is a dream I dream regularly enough to recreate at will. It involves my leaving cert maths teacher, an assortment of secondary school colleagues and I. In this dream I have the realisation that I have underestimated the difficulty of the…

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Dealing with Death on Social Media

Dealing with Death on Social Media

By Conor Linehan   This blog post presents a summary of work published in an upcoming paper: Jamison-Powell, S., Briggs, P., Lawson, S., Linehan, C., Windle, K., and Gross, H. (2016, in press). “PS. I Love You”: Understanding the Impact of Posthumous Digital Messages. In Proceedings…

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Food allergy and food intolerance – is the reported impact on our psychology real or exaggerated?

Food allergy and food intolerance – is the reported impact on our psychology real or exaggerated?

By Audrey DunnGalvin   Data on the European and global prevalence of food allergy and intolerances suggest that both reported and actual rates are increasing. Food allergy is becoming a major public health concern affecting up to 5% of adults and 8% of children, with…

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13th Annual Psychology, Health and Medicine Conference

13th Annual Psychology, Health and Medicine Conference

27th May University College Cork Dr Karen Matvienko-Sikar The superstitious among us may consider thirteen to be an unlucky number. That certainly won’t be the case for the 13th Annual Psychology, Health and Medicine Conference. This year the conference is being hosted in University College…

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Feeling our way

Feeling our way

Students from UCC’s Work and Organisational Psychology/Behaviour Masters. By. Dr. Carol Linehan I heard on the radio this morning that a survey in Irish workplaces identified the top ten phrases that irritate the hell out of people. These included “leave it with me”, “I’ll reach…

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What happens when Creativity becomes more important than Research?

What happens when Creativity becomes more important than Research?

From the Theory of Relativity to Apple’s 1,000 new jobs in Cork.   By Kasia Pyrz   It was one of those long evenings during which motivating a thirteen-year-old to memorise internal parts and workings of a volcano was proving to be a challenge. Being…

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